The Odd Harmonic

A collection of musings, distractions, inspirations, and other random crap that appeals to me....

whatgreatlarks asked: (1/1) Prodigy from Mobb Depp downtalked a Pitchfork Reviewer's cred in giving their InFamous reissue a 10/10, saying "If u don't come from our blood stream how can u make a proper assessment of our music? U don't understand it. U a outsider peeking in." That rings valid to me IF and only IF the white middle-aged dude is "only peeking in" and hasn't devoted many years of his life to studying hip-hop. For p4ks, I assume that to be true, but in the case of someone who has really put

selfdefensefamily:

[cont] the listening/reading time in, do you feel like that’ still a valid complaint? if not, why, if so, to what extent? Is that another form of claiming appropriation? does the fact that it’s an art critique change the relevancy of that complaint?

Kudos to Prodigy for saying that about a positive review. Anyone can question the validity of a negative review. Takes stones to put someone on blast after they compliment you. 

Truthfully, Prodigy probably doesn’t know that the reviewer is a posedawg. Unless, the review exposes that completely. Did it?

That whole, ‘you’ve got to know to know’ thing is fine. But, don’t expect anyone to give a shit. Like, Prodigy can think that all day. But we can all enjoy The Infamous all day. The Pitchfork poser’s comments don’t change the work for Prodigy. And Prodigy’s comments don’t change the work for poser. 

Shrug emoji. 

I can totally see the ass kissing insincerity of giving a reissue of an album a perfect 10, and totally understand the subsequent calling out. The initial struggle of it’s reception during its original release has a history within itself, especially for a genre like hip hop that has a real culture & community attached to it. It’s along the same lines as airing the best rap album on the Grammies and ignoring the fact that they refused to air it when it was starting to come up.

vicemag:

The #NotaBugSplat Art Piece in Pakistan Won’t Be Making Drone Pilots Feel Empathy
Earlier today, many publications, including VICE News, started reporting on a large art display in Northern Pakistan. Photos depict an open field or a rural farm on which a giant portrait of a young girl has been unraveled. It’s part of a project called #NotABugSplat.
Saks Afridi, the online PR rep for the project, says “for now, we’re an artist collective from Pakistan, USA, and France.” He won’t divulge precisely who else is involved for the time being. The French component, however, is reported to have been JR, who you may know from his sweet, humanity-affirming art, or his downright saccharine TED Talk.
As The Verge observed, #NotABugSplat is meant to show people coming together to say, “We exist.” In short, it’s like Banksy meets Kony 2012: Straight-up, uncut internet heroin.
Continue

vicemag:

The #NotaBugSplat Art Piece in Pakistan Won’t Be Making Drone Pilots Feel Empathy

Earlier today, many publications, including VICE News, started reporting on a large art display in Northern Pakistan. Photos depict an open field or a rural farm on which a giant portrait of a young girl has been unraveled. It’s part of a project called #NotABugSplat.

Saks Afridi, the online PR rep for the project, says “for now, we’re an artist collective from Pakistan, USA, and France.” He won’t divulge precisely who else is involved for the time being. The French component, however, is reported to have been JR, who you may know from his sweet, humanity-affirming art, or his downright saccharine TED Talk.

As The Verge observed, #NotABugSplat is meant to show people coming together to say, “We exist.” In short, it’s like Banksy meets Kony 2012: Straight-up, uncut internet heroin.

Continue

poisonivythecramps:

Lux Interior and Poison Ivy at San Diego Comic-Con International, 1985

Awesome

poisonivythecramps:

Lux Interior and Poison Ivy at San Diego Comic-Con International, 1985

Awesome